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Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. Jock Soto, one of the greatest ballet dancers of our time chronicles the unique circumstances of his extraordinary career, his life among other legends of dance, and his background as a half-Navajo, half-Puerto Rican gay man struggling to succeed in the straight white world of the arts.

Regarded as the greatest ballet dancer since Baryshnikov, Soto has achieved a level of Jock Soto, one of the greatest ballet dancers of our time chronicles the unique circumstances of his extraordinary career, his life among other legends of dance, and his background as a half-Navajo, half-Puerto Rican gay man struggling to succeed in the straight white world of the arts.

Edited by Rebekah J. Kowal, Gerald Siegmund, and Randy Martin

Regarded as the greatest ballet dancer since Baryshnikov, Soto has achieved a level of success and fame enjoyed by few. Ballet aficionados will be familiar with Soto from the award-winning PBS documentary, Water Flowing Together , which chronicled his life and career. Get A Copy. Hardcover , pages. More Details Other Editions 3. Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Every Step You Take , please sign up. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews.

The Story behind Ballerina Misty Copeland's Bestselling Memoir

Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Mar 25, V. Briceland rated it liked it. Reading dancer Jock Soto's memoir is a bit like skipping dinner for a supper of circulating tiny hors d'oeuvres at a swank cocktail party—there are plenty of tasty morsels, though nothing really fills you up. The book is initially narrated as if it's a memoir about a mixed-heritage gay man's relationship with his mother. It should perhaps have been a comprehensive look at Soto's career as principal dancer within the N Reading dancer Jock Soto's memoir is a bit like skipping dinner for a supper of circulating tiny hors d'oeuvres at a swank cocktail party—there are plenty of tasty morsels, though nothing really fills you up.

It should perhaps have been a comprehensive look at Soto's career as principal dancer within the New York City Ballet, but his early training is quickly related and anyone attempting to glean hard information about his work with George Balanchine or Jerome Robbins or any of the other hundreds of talented choreographers and artists with whom he worked will come away disappointed.

As a chronicle of its time, it suffers; Soto sums up the nineteen-eighties simply by tossing a mixed salad of names into a paragraph Andy Warhol! Debbie Harry! Keith Haring! The book's odd pacing and structure is made even more digressive by the inclusion—or interruption—of several of the author's favorite recipes. I like recipes.

Just not necessarily in my dance biographies. And I don't want to spoil anyone's experience of the book and its cuisine, but one of the recipes is more or less "Hey, why not spread some caviar on a toasted bagel? A full meal, however, it is not.

Dancing with the Midwives – A Memoir of Art and Grief

View all 3 comments. Sep 02, Sheri S. He initially learned the Native American hoop dance from his mother before eventually becoming an accomplished dancer. He talks about realizing he is gay and relationship struggles he experienced. He writes about his travels, famous people from the dance world and outside of it he met and his ventures as a chef. As a result of reading this book, I have gained a greater appreciation for the work that goes into creating and dancing a ballet. Aug 18, Jennifer rated it liked it Shelves: read-in I realized within the first few pages of the book that I really knew nothing about him beyond his gorgeous stage presence and athletic and refined dancing.

Every Step You Take isn't the best title for this or any book, and the writing isn't stellar. But Soto offers many personal details that allowed for me to feel connected to him and hi 3. But Soto offers many personal details that allowed for me to feel connected to him and his experiences, and the timing of his rise and of Balanchine's last days at the helm were intriguing. Some readers may not enjoy this book, especially given the more recent news and developments around NYCB leadership.

At times the book feels a bit too much like it is relying on various sexual relationships between company members, and the organization of the narrative is at times abrupt. Still, I appreciated Soto's willingness to be vulnerable on the page and write about his youth, his coming out, his career, and finding love and a career after his own retirement from dance. Nov 05, Lisa Hura rated it liked it.

Every Step You Take: A Memoir is a look back for Jock Soto at his family and his career, sorting through the influences that made him a unique figure in the ballet world. Jock got interested in ballet at the Every Step You Take: A Memoir is a look back for Jock Soto at his family and his career, sorting through the influences that made him a unique figure in the ballet world.


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Jock got interested in ballet at the ripe old age of four, while watching Edward Villella dance on the Ed Sullivan Show. His parents took his request seriously and enrolled him in ballet classes. At 12 years old he auditioned for the School of American Ballet and was awarded a full scholarship. After a brief interruption in his training, he returned to New York with his family and at 14 years old, his family left, leaving Jock alone in New York City, with no income other than his school stipend and no adult supervision. Who does that? Who leaves their kid alone in the big city like that?

But he roomed with other dancers, couch-surfed a bit, and eventually built a family for himself among the dancers there. This new family of his is a theme throughout the book, the way he drew together with people who could give him the support and understanding that his family could not.

Fiercely honest memoir

His mother is Navajo and his father is Puerto Rican. Throughout his life, it was clear that his father carried on affairs with other women — he also has another half-brother from one of these liaisons. His father was very macho and not terribly accepting of his gay son. His mother was virtually disowned by her family for a number of reasons, not the least of which was marrying a man outside the tribe.

While he obviously loved his family very much, there is a sort of disconnect.

Into The Wild

They really lived in different worlds. First, let me say I enjoyed this book very much. I loved the glimpses into the life of a dancer — not just a prima ballerina, not just a principal dancer, but the day-to-day life of a dancer in the corps — and the way his life changes as he moves through the ranks. He was a principal dancer with the New York City Ballet for 20 years — the list of ballets and dancers and choreographers he knew is huge.

I still have that autographed photo, but I have never told Misha about it. It is an amazing story of success from humble beginnings, taking an unexpected path.

I did find the writing a little clunky in places. The narrative jumps around a lot, going backwards and forwards in time. Jock occasionally gets a little lost trying to describe the emotion of being a dancer. Overall, an interesting memoir and a pretty compelling look at a very interesting life.

Aug 06, Laura de Leon rated it liked it Shelves: review-copy , non-fiction , memoir , dance , blogged. He actually lived in the Phoenix area around the same time I did, and he lived a similarly middle-class life at the time. There the similarities between our paths ends.

Critical Perspectives on Art, Politics and Culture

Even more than his talent which I hear about indirectly in the book, but I don't really see, since it is hard to get the true nature of dance through the written word , I am awed by his d 3. Even more than his talent which I hear about indirectly in the book, but I don't really see, since it is hard to get the true nature of dance through the written word , I am awed by his dedication to dance.

He knows from a very young age exactly what he wants to do, and is willing to spend all his time and energy on it at an age when most children have a much more limited attention span. Other editions. Enlarge cover. Error rating book. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Details if other :. Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. It is our ID; this is how we know who we are and where we have been. But she has only rarely given readers a glimpse into her influences and formative years. She reflects on her early love of archeology, the fragments of the ancients that have accompanied her journey—including a sherd of Egyptian ceramic depicting dancing fish and ammonites found years ago on a Dorset beach.

She also writes insightfully about aging and what life looks like from where she now stands. Get A Copy.